Integrative Journal of Nursing and Health https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH <p>The <strong>Integrative Journal of Nursing and Health (ISSN: 2641-3248)</strong>&nbsp;is a world renowned international peer reviewed journal. IJNH objective is to provide a platform for the researchers, clinical practitioners and readers who are committed to advancing practice and proficient development by exchanging the knowledge that is directly relevant to all spheres of nursing and midwifery practice.</p> <p><strong>Why publish your article in Integrative Journal of Nursing and Health?</strong></p> <p>Gratis open access policy allows maximum visibility of articles published in the journal as they are available to whole global audience.&nbsp;Integrative Journal of Nursing and Health offers a fast publication schedule where every work undergoes rigorous peer review; all articles must be submitted online, and peer review is managed fully electronically (articles are distributed in PDF form, which is automatically generated from the submitted files). Articles will be published with their final citation after acceptance, in both full text and as a formatted PDF.</p> en-US editor.ijnh@gratisoa.org (Ronald Quick) info@gratisoa.org (Ronald Quick) OJS 3.1.2.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Course Evaluation of Makeup Therapy Practice https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1502 <p>Interest in complementary and alternative medicine/therapy is on the rise, and their inclusion in nursing education is increasing. The overcrowding of curriculum in basic nursing education is continuing and an insufficient amount of time is secured. In order to improve the quality of the practice, it is necessary to evaluate the contents and to improve it. Therefore, the research was conducted to clarify the improvement points of the Makeup Therapy practice, over the 5-year period from 2014 to 2018. The average score for all questions by year was 4.71 or higher in 5-stage evaluation. Compared to other subscales, independent participation by students was a high ratio of students who answered “doesn’t apply well”, and “doesn’t apply at all”. This study clarified that the makeup therapy exercise had been highly evaluated for five years. And it has become clear that the practice was developed to be easy to understand in terms of purpose and significance. In addition, it also clarified improvement points for further evaluation. Consideration of time distribution and teaching methods that can draw out the subjectivity of the students will improve the quality of the Makeup Therapy practice.</p> Kudo K, Kumasaka T, Fujisawa H Copyright (c) 2019 Kudo et al. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1502 Wed, 06 Feb 2019 04:46:58 +0000 The Influence of a Group Education Programme at the Workplace on Intensity of and Knowledge about Interprofessional Collaboration in Nursing Homes: A Pilot for Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1507 <p><strong>Background:</strong> Interprofessional Learning (IPL) and improving the intensity of Interprofessional Collaboration (IPC) have been shown to create teams that work together better and improve patients outcome. With this study we aim to measure the effect of an educational module on the intensity of IPC as well as on the knowledge about IPC.<br><strong>Methods:</strong> A cluster randomized controlled pilot trial in three nursing homes was set up aiming to investigate the influence of an educational module offered as workplace learning for the intervention group. We measured intensity of collaboration and knowledge of IPC using questionnaires completed by the participating staff in nursing homes at four time points; baseline, 6 months, 12 months and finally 18 months.<br><strong>Results:</strong> Twenty-nine professionals from the nursing homes participated of which fifteen were in the intervention group. In total eleven different disciplines were represented. At all-time points the control group scored significantly higher than the intervention group (p = 0.0324) for intensity of IPC. Both groups, intervention and control group, scored significantly higher (p = 0.0088) for both outcomes after the intervention period. No relevant correlation between intensity of IPC and the general knowledge about IPC was found at any time point (0 ≤ R² ≤ 0.2).<br><strong>Conclusions:</strong> Scores on knowledge of IPC and intensity of collaboration increased over time in both study groups, with the control group having higher scores than the intervention group at any time point. More research is needed to explore if an educational intervention can influence the perception of intensity of IPC and result in more strict evaluation of it.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> Tsakitzidis G, Coenen S, Fransen E, Timmermans O, Truijen S, Meulemans H, Van Royen P Copyright (c) 2019 Tsakitzidis et al. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1507 Wed, 20 Feb 2019 08:41:19 +0000 Estimating Risk for 1-Year Readmission at an Academic Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Unit https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1612 <p><strong>Introduction:</strong> Readmission following psychiatric hospitalization is a common adverse outcome and rates of readmission are a valid indicator for the quality of inpatient care. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors available at the time of discharge associated with a higher risk for 1-year inpatient psychiatric readmission.<br><strong>Methods:</strong> Based on review of the literature, candidate risk factors for readmission were selected and abstracted from the discharge summaries of all 849 adult patients admitted to the University of Virginia Health System’s general inpatient psychiatric unit in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors and estimate risk for psychiatric readmission within 1 year of index admission<br><strong>Results:</strong> 23% of patients were readmitted within 1 year. Risk factors for readmission included diagnoses of thought disorder (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, p-value [<em>p</em>] = 0.004) and substance-induced mood disorder (OR = 3.65, <em>p</em> = 0.028). Conclusions: This study identified unique risk and protective factors for 1-year psychiatric readmission. Identifying unit-specific risk factors for readmission may inform discharge planning and improve patient outcomes.</p> Buckley PJ, Smith JR, Mir S, Ait-Daoud N, Bashir M Copyright (c) 2019 Buckley et al. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1612 Thu, 04 Apr 2019 05:23:55 +0000 Restructuring a Course using Kolb’s Learning Theory https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1619 <p>The purpose of this article is to chronicle the restructuring of an online graduate level course using Kolb’s Experiential Learning theory. The goal was to increase student satisfaction in the approach to the course, create an engaging environment, structure the assignments to meet the outcomes of the course and have the students retain the information longer after course finish. &nbsp;Through student evaluations and faculty commentary the restructuring was a success with positive feedback. The results for student satisfaction were overwhelmingly positive for the changes to the course. The students felt the assignments kept in the course were effective in meeting the outcomes of the course. Of the 50 respondents answering the question: “Were the assignments in the course an effective modality to meet the course outcomes?” 49% strongly agreed, 45% agreed, 2% were neutral, and 4% disagreed. The change increased faculty and student engagement and allowed the student to feel more connected to the topic. Future studies that follow this will be to determine if the material is retained over a longer period of time based on the structure of the course utilizing the Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory.The purpose of this article is to chronicle the restructuring of an online graduate level course using Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory. The goal was to increase student satisfaction in the approach to the course, create an engaging environment, structure the assignments to meet the outcomes of the course and have the students retain the information longer after course finish. Through student evaluations and faculty commentary the restructuring was a success with positive feedback. The results for student satisfactions were overwhelmingly positive for the changes to the course. The students felt the assignments kept in the course were effective in meeting the outcomes of the course. Of the 50 respondents answering the question: “Were the assignments in the course an effective modality to meet the course outcomes?” 49% strongly agreed, 45% agreed, 2% were neutral, and 4% disagreed. The change increased faculty and student engagement and allowed the student to feel more connected to the topic. Future studies that follow this will be to determine if the material is retained over a longer period of time based on the structure of the course utilizing the Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory.</p> Cornelius ST Copyright (c) 2019 Cornelius ST https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1619 Tue, 16 Apr 2019 09:12:39 +0000 Do Representatives Represent you? https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1805 <p><strong>Introduction:</strong> Representation by a small group of chosen representatives is a common used strategy for decision making within a large heterogeneous group of people. In hospital and first-line setting, we measured the level of representatives-peers agreement for representatives that were selectively chosen by peers and those that were randomly selected.<br><strong>Method:</strong> Professionals working in hospital-obstetric and first-line midwifery domains, 23 representatives and 114 represented peers, gave their opinion on obstetric topics by ranking 681 statements on a 10-point Likert scale. Correlations between representatives and peers scores were assessed with Bland-Altman difference plots. Level of agreement was evaluated by area under the curve (AUC) of the difference in statement score.<br><strong>Results:</strong> Statement scores of chosen representatives correlated well with their peers (r = 0.91). Fifty percent of representatives and peers scores differed less than 1.9 point. The average representative-peers agreement was 77%. Selectively chosen gynecologists and midwives showed comparable levels of agreement (gyn AUC 0.77 vs. mid AUC 0.75, <em>p</em> = 0.105), whereas randomly selected professionals tend to differ in professional view (gyn AUC 0.80 vs. mid AUC 0.74, <em>p</em> = 0.052). The selection method led to no differences within the group of gynecologists (chosen AUC 0.77 vs. random AUC 0.80, <em>p</em> = 0.220) and midwives (chosen AUC 0.75 vs. random AUC 0.74, <em>p</em> = 0.859).<br><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Decision making by representatives within a diverse group of professionals, largely reflects the opinion of their peers. The selection method of representatives and the professionals’ working environment do not statistically affect the level of representative-peers agreement.</p> <p><br><br></p> Lemmens S, Lopes van Balen V, De Vries R, Scheepers L, Spaanderman M Copyright (c) 2019 Lemmens et al. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1805 Tue, 29 Oct 2019 04:41:02 +0000 Using Mindfulness Approaches to Treat Urge Urinary Incontinence in Older Adult Women: A Scoping Review https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1453 <p><strong>Objectives:</strong> The research literature was examined to evaluate evidence of mindfulness approaches to treat urge urinary incontinence in older adult women. Older adult women with urge urinary incontinence are not sufficiently treated with current practices, yet the potential application of mindfulness-based stress reduction to urge urinary incontinence is relatively unknown.<br><strong>Methods:</strong> A scoping review was conducted to locate scientific literature using mindfulness to treat urinary incontinence in older adult women. No studies examined mindfulness for urinary incontinence specifically in an older adult female, or older adult, population. No mixed gender studies, nor studies only on men, with mindfulness as treatment of urinary incontinence were discovered.<br><strong>Results:</strong> Two studies met the expanded inclusion criteria of mindfulness as a treatment for urinary incontinence in adults (not specifically older adults). Both demonstrated that mindfulness-based stress reduction reduced urge urinary incontinence symptoms and increased health-related quality of life and global impression of improvement after completion of the intervention and at follow-up.<br><strong>Conclusions:</strong> Mindfulness-based stress reduction remains a novel approach. Preliminary research indicates mindfulness-based stress reduction works in the general population to reduce urge urinary incontinence, but has not been examined in large clinical trials, or in special populations such as adults 65 and older. There is a paucity of research investigating urinary urge incontinence in older adult women, notably studies which evaluate both conventional and integrative approaches. As such, future research is indicated to identify efficacious treatment approaches to address this distressing and common condition.&nbsp;</p> Felsted KF, Supiano KP Copyright (c) 2019 Felsted et al. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1453 Mon, 21 Jan 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Transitional Care Model for Patients with Acromegaly https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1775 <p>The long-term care of acromegaly patients is associated with numerous challenges, including frequent monitoring, parenteral drug administration, chronic comorbidities, treatment-related adverse events and limited specialty care centers. Improving health-related outcomes can be hindered by gaps in collaboration across various health care settings. An Acromegaly Nurse Consensus Panel comprising highly experienced endocrine nurses to review this problem. Close collaboration between specialty care centers with community care settings may improve the overall quality of care received by acromegaly patients. Carefully transitioning care for patients with chronic illnesses may improve their physical functioning, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction among patients and caregivers.</p> Pulaski-Liebert KJ, Yedinak C Copyright (c) 2019 Pulaski-Liebert et al. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1775 Mon, 27 May 2019 03:55:07 +0000 Appraising the need for Specialist Nursing to Support Women Living with Breast Cancer in England https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1656 <p><strong>Introduction:</strong> The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise the availability of specifically trained nurses to support people living with cancer, whilst reviewing some current issues challenging women in England suffering with breast cancer and the need for breast cancer specialist nurses (BCSN). Particularly focussing on the geography of where the author is starting her career in nursing.<br><strong>Methodology:</strong> A systematic review was undertaken to establish the current evidence about the effect of BCSN’s services on the welfare and well-being of women living with breast cancer. The paper also reviews the impact of some services that have been established in the North West of England and how these might be transferred within the NHS.<br><strong>Results:</strong> The results show that there is a need for more trained BCSNs as they demonstrate a positive impact on the experience and wider support that breast cancer patients require.<br><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The conclusion is that more investment should be targeted at this vital service and by establishing the evidence, taking the learning from local schemes and then spreading best practice can only be of benefit to this cohort of patients. The problem lies in the inadequate resourcing for training and job availability for BCSNs, with unclear commissioning arrangements for this service.</p> Kingsland AE Copyright (c) 2019 Kingsland AE. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://www.gratisoa.org/journals/index.php/IJNH/article/view/1656 Tue, 05 Mar 2019 05:31:25 +0000