Vol. 6 No. 1 (2020): Articles in Press
Research Article

The Consumption of Salmon Trout as a Risk Factor for Hepatic Steatosis in Murines: Canthaxanthin as a risk for steatosis.

Marta Maciel
UFRJ/Macaé
Bio
Juliana Latini
UFRJ/Macaé
Bio
Marina Souto
UFRJ/Macaé
Bio
Isabella Vilela
UFRJ/Macaé
Bio
Flávia Calixto
FIPERJ
Bio
Kátia Lenzi-Almeida
UFRJ/Macaé
Bio
Published April 17, 2020
Keywords
  • Canthaxanthin,
  • Salmon Trout,
  • Morphometry,
  • Hepatotoxicity,
  • Steatosis

Abstract

Canthaxanthin is a fat-soluble carotenoid with antioxidant properties, which is found naturally in algae and
cyanobacteria, and is widely used as a dye in the food industry. The present study aims to demonstrate possible
organic lesions attributed to the consumption of canthaxanthin, used in the breeding of captive fish such as salmon trout, which is highly appreciated in cooking, whose consumption is mistakenly linked to the high nutritional values present in wild salmon but not in the salmon trout. The experimental research was composed of four groups of Swiss mice and their respective offspring: Control Group (CG); Canthaxanthin Group (CXG); Salmon Trout Group (STG); and Wild Salmon Group (WSG), respectively receiving a standard diet based on casein, a diet of canthaxanthin, salmon trout and wild salmon. Each group received the designated diet throughout the experiment, including gestation and lactation, subsequently the offspring, after weaning, received the same diet as the group that their mothers belonged to. The samples were analyzed at two different times, at 40 days and 70 days of life. From the morphometric analyzes, significant changes were observed, such as glomerular swelling in the kidneys and steatosis in the liver, in the CXG and STG groups, which have canthaxanthin as a common factor. These changes were more exuberant and more statistically significant in the STG, principally in the 70-day samples, the worst results possibly attributed to the poor nutritional quality of salmon trout and the longer exposure time to the canthaxanthin molecule.