Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to assess any negative effects that treatment with mirtazapine may incur in diabetic patients.


Methods: This study included 33 patients enrolled in naturalistic diabetes treatment that had also been diagnosed withdepression and prescribed mirtazapine for at least 6 months. Another 33 diabetic patients who had not taken any psychiatricmedicines were included as a control group. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceridelevels, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months.


Results: The dose of mirtazapine at baseline was 24.3 ± 14.0 mg/d in the mirtazapine group, and the 2 groups did not differin any baseline characteristics except for total cholesterol levels. Body mass index increased in both groups, and the change inthe mirtazapine group (1.0 ± 0.6 kg/m) was significantly greater than that in the control group (0.3 ± 0.4 kg/m, P < 0.001) at6 months. Only the control group exhibited a decrease in fasting plasma glucose, whereas both groups showed a decrease inHbA1c, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol, an increase in high-density lipoprotein, and no change in triglyceridelevels. None of the differences between the groups were statistically significant.


Conclusions: In conclusion, mirtazapine increased the weight gain of diabetic patients; however, other diabetic and lipidmarkers generally did not worsen during the 6-month treatment period. These results suggest that, at least in the short term,mirtazapine is safe for diabetic patients in a stable state and are undergoing appropriate diabetic treatment.


Biography:Duk-In Jon has completed his MD and PhD from Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea. He is the professor of psychiatry in theHallym University Sacred Heart Hospital.